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characters. dwight eisenhower himself who comes off as a kind of sad and tragic figure in the book. he starts off as kind of a general on the whitehorse and comes back to redeem the republic and about where she talks about her being a normal suburban housewife. but there is also a fascinating thing about pat nixon and that is that she is weirdly open about the fact that she doesn't really seem to like politics and seems to have some even trepidation about being with her husband. she writes an article, a puff piece for her husband that has a title, a wonderful guy in which she has this quote that i make a lot of which she says dick doesn't do anything in a half-hearted manner so i know we are in for a rugged time. this isn't a piece that is supposedly a celebration of her husband's virtues and yet she is kind of saying she is worried about him, about what her life is going to be and things like that. to get a real sense that with both eisenhower and pat nixon that politics transforms people in sometimes ways that they don't necessarily want. another characters joseph mccarthy. he is running in
wonderful secondary characters. obviously dwight eisenhower himself, who comes off as a kind of sad and tragic figure in this book. he starts off as the kind of general on a white hours who come -- white horse who comes back to redeem the public and slap back corruption of the truman administration and return the public to its ideal values and also just someone who winds up going further and further to the right and play -- placating the right. and the relationship between nixon and eisenhower is a very curious one and kind of a father-son element, and there's a lot of pundits who enter the book, including joe alsop and there's pat nixon, pat nixon is a prop to dick nixon, quite literally during the speech. she is sitting there nervously, not knowing what he is going to say. she is crucial into the strategy of making her husband look normal. he talks about her being a normal suburban house wife but there's a fascinating think about pat nixon, and she is weirdly open about the fact that she doesn't really seem to like politics, and seems to even have some kind of trepidation about be
by president eisenhower during the final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i have been playing around with words for a long time and i think when i was a kid i wasn't that athletic and i wasn't that smart in various ways but i could always memorize a couple of words so i was familiar with words like apathetic and things like that which for a third-grader was a lot of fun. as i got to be an older person i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of my favorite exercises was one time when my kids were young they were shipped the "guinness book of world records" and in those days in order to get in the guinness book you had to -- or push a painted across iowa with your nose. when i'd looked in the guinness book i came upon a word that had the most meaning in english which was set in for. it had 137 meanings. but it was one of the words with the most meanings. the soft underbelly of this book was language and words so i started working on a collection of words and i have now gone through seven o
'll share with you some of the comments of dwight eisenhower in his farewell address. what is the role in government in solving america's problems. you can join the conversation by giving us a call. you can send us an e-mail at journal at cspan.org. let's begin with the act two second terms for u.s. presidents have been problematic but not cursed. what history will says about how president obama will do. will obama blow another mandate. meanwhile from the hill newspaper there is this words from senator mitch mcconnell after four years of frosty relations senator mcconnell is reaching out to the president. senator mcconnell called on the president to use his inauguration speech to focus on the massive federal debt happeninging over the heads of our children and grandchildren. it is an offer senator mcconnell made four years ago but was soon forgotten. in his editorial he said given the serious nature of the challenge, i hope the president uses his address to acknowledge the seriousness of the debt crisis and lace out ways working with both parties in the congress can get spending under
about serving on the united states commission on civil rights. set ultimate by president eisenhower in 1957. this is about a half an hour. >>> on your screen now on booktv is a well known face for c-span viewers. that's mary francis berry. professor at the university of pennsylvania. she's also the author of several books. at the university of pennsylvania today to talk to her about this book. "and justice for all." "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" mary francis berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission begin and why? >> well, it started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with secretary of state about the way the united states was seen around the world because a lot of the racism that was going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening whether it was lynching or some kind of discrimination that took place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower -- said he was going to ask congress to set up
experiences serving on the united states commission set up by president ivan not -- eisenhower. this is about half an hour. >> well, on your screen now on book tv is a well-known face for c-span yours. that is mary frances berry, a professor at the university of pennsylvania, also the author of several books. at the university of pennsylvania today to talk to her about this book. the nets is commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> is started in 1957. president eisenhower had had a lot of discussions with the secretary of state about the way the united states was seen around the world because of a lot of the racism that was going on and people here about and read about. the fact that this seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening and whether it was launching or some kind of discrimination that was taking place in the country so that the idea was eisenhower said that he was going to ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission which would put the facts on top of th
imagine marshall saying to eisenhower january 44, a company that 18 months, time for some else to have a term. marshall and eisenhower made a lot of decisions in 42. they need to make mistakes and learn from them. eisenhower at one point in africa thought he might be relieved. he sent a letter to his son single, that's the nature of the business, don't worry about it. we will all go on. >> that's one of the critiques i've seen about your prescription to the book is a question of if rix wants us to fire more generals does that mean doesn't tolerate mistakes? by turner to suggest even our greatest leaders made plenty of mistakes on the personal front as well as -- >> you had 155 men elected to be division commanders in combat in the army in world war ii. many hurdles before that. marshall cleaned up 600 senior officers before the war began. officers he considered dead weight. that's the phrase used to frankfurter when frankfurter was talking to him. of the 155 men who commanded divisions in combat in the army in world war ii, 15 were fired. sorry, 16 were fired. of the 16, five were give
, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 961. 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like ap nettic and things like that -- apathetic, you know, which for the third grader was a lot of of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of my favorite exercises was one time when my kids were young, you know, they worshiped the guinness book of world records, and in those days in order to get in the guinness book you had to either eat a bicycle or push a peanut across iowa with your nose to get in this book. so i was looking at the guinness book, and i came upon the word that had the most meanings in english which was set, s-e-t. it had 137 meanings, you know, a set of
. it was a valuable marketing tool. you could add another example to that president eisenhower who worked with democratic leaders, lyndon johnson. i talked with the brookings scholar who was a young aide in the eisenhower white house. he said eisenhower was deeply not do anything. an and lbj but he knew to make things work you had to have this getting along. the key difference here is johnson, rayburn, o'neal, they could deliver. this president does not have someone who can deliver and in the senate, republicans have abused the fill bupser. -- filibuster. >> describe eisenhower? >> he was devious. >> he was the most devious person nixon had ever known. you said, i mean that in a positive sense. >> they could work together. >> reagan was not actually dealing with a house my majority, -- minority, that there was a conservative majority in the house. when you add the republicans and conservative democrats. what we had was ideological sorting since then of the the parties were nor geographical. nowadays if you're conservative, you're republican. if you're a liberal, you're a democrat. obama i
eisenhower says -- the secretary of defense says we cannot cut anymore. eisenhower says, just go to every base and tell them that they will get another star if they cut. i guarantee you will be killed in a stampede. >> charles wants a commission that has these thoughts and congress votes on it. we had that. it was called simpson-bowles. the republicans have talked that effort. i agree, defense spending can be cut, but look at one thing, personnel has skyrocketed because of an all-volunteer force. >> what can we afford? walter pincus had a column in "the washington post) this week talking about the reserve policy board. we can no longer afford the all volunteer military if we plan to pay allowances and retirement benefits for the troops and their families. >> one tricky thing is we have very generous health benefits from the military. the military deserters society's protections, but if you look at those numbers, -- not just soldiers -- but it is their families and extended families. it is a sacred cattle. that is the kind of thing you have to do. >> every defense secretary has wanted to c
. we know names like ridgway and eisenhower. the younger officers who were moved up because they were successful and we lost in korea, vietnam and iraq. >> i am glad you bring up colonel again wing in iraq is that clearly is the context informs the book although it is a work of history going back to world war ii and to the present day. you make the point that there is more accountability lower down on the food chain than our general officers now. [inaudible] >> that's exact rewrite. [laughter] that is not in the book i don't think. how many people have held to account for the disastrous setbacks the military had early on, the failure to see things? >> not really. the stunning thing to me is, good trivia question, who is the last army division commander relieved from combat ineffectiveness? as best as i can tell is major general james baldwin in 1971. since then, generals have been fired but they get fired for basically taking down their pants at the wrong time at the wrong place with the wrong person. it's a little bit like having tenure for university professor. you can get fired fir
of a universal newsreel covering the second not euro for dwight eisenhower in 1957. he defeated former illinois governor adlai stevenson in the 1956 campaign. the official inaugural date of january 20 was a sunday in 1957. president eisenhower was officially sworn in in private. a public ceremony, on the capital's west front, with the next day. this is 10 minutes. ♪ >> you, the white d eisenhower, do solemnly swear that you will face fully -- faithfully execute the office of president of the you knighted states -- united states and well, to the best of your ability, preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states, so help you god. >> i, dwight d eisenhower, do solemnly swear that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states, so help me god. >> the first time any president had prefaced his inaugural address with a prayer. >> we pray. writes from wrong and allow all our words and actions to be governed thereby and by the laws of this land. especi
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commission on civil rights set up by president eisenhower in 1857. this is about half an hour. >> on your screen now is a well-known face for c-span viewers. that's mary frances berry, professor at the university of pennsylvania and also the author several books. with university of pennsylvania today to chat to her about this book, "and justice for all: the united states commission on civil rights and the continuing struggle for freedom in america" . mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began? >> guest: the civil rights missions started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state, but the way the united states is in or on the road because of the racism going on that people would hear about and read about. and the fact that there seem to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether it is one chain or some discrimination taking place in the country said the idea was that eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to save the civil rights commission, which would put the facts on top of the table. i'm told
george washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. lincoln as its successful -- special case and that his second term was so brief. the it is interesting to note that only the president who had a more successful second term than their first was james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the presidents elected to a second term, and the reasons for those that have experienced failed or troubled second terms. for failed because of a war that seemed unwinnable, or for lack of preparedness. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the four. also, for failed because of economic crisis for failure to act to deter such a crisis. these were jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt from the 37 downturn, and george bush. at failed due to their inability to lead congress were jefferson, monroe, grants, wilson, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. to failed due to hubris, franklin roosevelt, and richard nixon are the four who did not effectively communicate their agendas or initiatives were jefferso
washington, james madison, andrew jackson, theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan and bill clinton. the game is a special case in his successful second term was so brief. it's interesting to note that only presidents who had a more successful second term than their first were james madison and andrew jackson. the following is an accounting of the president-elect did to a second term and the reasons for those failed for a troubled second term. for failed because of a water seems on unwinnable. jefferson, truman, johnson and bush were the foyer. also for a failed because of the economic crisis for failure to act and deter such a crises. these are jefferson, cleveland, coolidge, franklin roosevelt's and george bush. it failed due to their inability to lead congress for jefferson, monroe, grant, well some, truman, johnson, nixon and bush. franklin roosevelt and richard nixon. for he did not affect the philly communicate their agendas or initiatives for jefferson, monroe, grant in cleveland. obviously failure for second term president has been their inability to successfully wor
where the secretary of cent -- defense says we cannot cut anymore, and eisenhower says, just go to every base and tellhem that they will get other sr if they are cut. i guarantee you that they will have a stampede. >> charles wants a commission that has these cuts. we had one of those, it was called some symbols. the republicans voted against it. -- simpson-bowles. defense spending can be cut, but personnel has skyrocketed because of an all-a volunteer force. >> there was a column in "e washington post" this week talking about the defense department's reserve policy board. we can no longer for the all- volunteer military if we plan to continue paying retirement for the troops. >> we have very generous health benefits for the military. the military deserves society's protections, but if you look at those numbers -- and it is not just soldiers, it is their family, extended family. it is aacd catt, but that is the sort of thing you have to do. >> every defense secretary has wanted to cut it for a couple of decades now and congress says no. >> look at the changing threat level, look at what
column defending eisenhower were creating this verb. they hadn't even heard prioritize yet. it was the same resort of reaction. counterproductive was another one. the first example they can find is counterproductive, which sounds like a military term, once well untrammeled someone within war room. i'm building up to who i think is the king of them all. but lyndon johnson he picked up a couple. again, i'm using every thing i can find. pressing the flesh was a johnson is on. lady byrd johnson comes up with motorcade. it's picked up by time magazine. there was no example of that in writing before. richard nixon had some nice ones. expletive deleted is really his. when they go over the watergate trial, it became its own sort of curse word. another one was really interesting at the time. talking about winding down the war. george h. w. bush had his own words. the cheap shot was to say that these were all off the wall. the word resume came into the english language in 1531 and one other words of the words it was always attributed to him which was stranded jury, was actually a cre
eisenhower, who defeated at lay stevenson. like this year, the official inaugural day falls on sunday in 1957, president eisenhower was sworn in in private, followed by the ceremony on the west front of the capital the next day. this is 10 minutes. ♪ >> do you, dwight d. eisenhower, solemnly swear that you will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will to the best of your ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states, so help you god? >> so help me, god. >> thank you very much. [applause] >> as the president looked out on the gathright, he looked back to 1953, when he offered the famous eisenhower prayer, the first time for such a prayer. >> give us, we pray, the power to discern clearly right from wrong and allow all of our words and actions to be governed by the laws of this land. especially, we pray that our concerns be for all of the people, regardless of station, race, or color. >> -- >> mr. chairman, mr. vice president, mr. chief justice, mr. speaker, members of my family and friends, my countrymen, and the friends of my cou
? >> i would go back to the eisenhower rate. you know what eisenhower was taxing people out? 70% to 90%. you want to go back to a rate where there is a supertax on the very rich and millionaires. you want to get rid of the loopholes. look at the capital gains tax of 15%. we are taxing work the barely taxing wealth region but barely tax and wealth. that is the wrong priority. -- we're taxing work but barely taxing wealth. the robin hood taxes an idea whose time has come. radicals light nicholke nicolasy and angela merkel have a tax on currency transactions that would bring in $350 billion a year. some of my heroes are the nurses of this country. national nurses united heal america. tax-loss >>> there are a slew -- tax on wall street. there are a slew of good things that 1%ers are for. >> he is not really offering of a lot. >> he is talking about being taxed less than his assistant. there is a group of patriotic millionaires. it is the belief that you owe backe to a country that has helped to make you what you are. steve jobs -- we had a tough column in the last issue. it was tough not a
to patraeus and when it came out. during world war ii, general eisenhower was having a long-term affair with an attractive young british driver named case summers be. you know, what general hires a young female model to be his aide and if you will. a major middle letter. now, imagine if eisenhower's affair with case summers became known during world war ii and, as happened with patraeus, if we got rid of him before d-day? during the great depression. franklin roosevelt was having affairs. franklin roosevelt had two very long-term affairs. one with margaret, his personal aide and secretary and cook and dresser and vinedresser, apparently. what if we found out about fdr's this behavior. what if we threw fdr out of office and demanded his resignation as the economy was recovering? all the way back to the french and indian war of very young george washington was riding very romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was salutary bear facts to my very attractive, older, sophisticated never. what if washington's letters have become public during the french and indian wa
. >> our special guest, susan o z eisenhower taking on the web ad about the obama daughters. >>> and surprise, even bo obama gets into the act as the first family greets unsuspecting tourists at the white house. with, in fact, a fist bump from the commander in chief. >>> and good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. a busy day here, secretary clinton final facing tough questions from senate republicans about benghazi. >> i'm glad that you're accepting responsibility. i think that ultimately with your leaving you accept the culpability for the worst tragedy since 9/11, and i really mean that. had i been president at the time and i found that you did not read the cables from benghazi, you did not read the cables from ambassador stevens, i would have relieved you from your post. >> well, joining me now for our daily fix, chris cillizza, msnbc contributor and nbc's capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell, and david sanger. welcome, all. chris, we've seen these kinds of dramas before. this one was pretty tough. of course, the house side yet to come. how is hillary clin
representative america came during her first year as second lady when president eisenhower sent his vice president on a tour beginning in asia and continuing to parts of the subcontinue innocent during the fall of -- continue innocent during the fall of 1953. president eisenhower told the vice president that he should take pat with him and that he realized this trip was going to be work, but it was going to be interesting. pat described the impending trip in those exact same words in a letter she wrote to a good friend next month. along with a minimal entourage that included a military aide, a state department representative, a flight surgeon, three press representatives, two secret service agents, nixon's administrative assistant and the only other woman on the trip, rosemary woods, the nixons embarked on their 42,000-mile journey. in a little more than two months, the group visited over 15 countries, attended hundreds of state dinners, participated in innumerable ceremonies and spoke with millions of people. the state department had briefed the group on the many countries and peoples t
and on the other side. rusher seized that. in '52 he knows that eisenhower isn't going to be a great champion of conservative causes, probably also knew that eisenhower would not be that aggressive an anti-communist. but he wanted to win. well, to keep this reasonably concise but to finish the thought because it is important, rusher believed that moderate republican administration under dwight eisenhower who was president for eight years just wasn't ideological enough, wasn't anti-communist enough either at home or abroad. rusher believed there was still a significant communist threat within the united states. more and more documentation of that, you know, has come out in the last 20 years after the opening of the ex-soviet archives. buckley also -- a couple of years younger than rusher. all of you know probably that he wrote "god and man at yale" which came out in 1951 after graduating from yale. he has two beefs with yale, and rusher shared them. he was a graduate of princeton prewar and during the war. buckley says yale is, um, insufficiently respectful of religion despite its, you know, r
that eisenhower isn't going to be a great champion of conservative cause and probably knew that eisenhower wouldn't be that aggressive and anti-communist, but he wanted to win. well, to keep this reasonably concise but to finish the thought because it is important, russia believed the moderate republican administration under dwight eisenhower was president for eight years just wasn't ideological enough, wasn't anti-communist and have either at home or abroad, rusher believed there was a communist threat within the united states. more and more documentation of that has come out in the last 20 years after the opening of the soviet archives. buckley also a couple of years younger than rusher all of you know probably that he wrote god and man and yale. rusher was a graduate of princeton before the war and during war. bulkeley says it is in respect of religion despite their religious heritage of the academe in america. also they don't prevent. their cause i socialists. rusher agreed with all of that. but, i think a greater affinity with buckley can be seen in buckley and his brother-in-law's 1954 book
similarities to the 2012 campaign on our side and the other side. rusher sees that. in 52 he knows eisenhower is a great champion of conservative causes. probably also knew that eisenhower would not be that aggressive and anti-communist but wanted to win. to keep this reasonably concise but to finish the thought because it is important, rusher believed that moderate republican administration under dwight eisenhower, was president for eight years, just wasn't ideological enough, wasn't anti-communist enough either at home or abroad, believed there was a significant communist threat in the united states, more documentation of that has come out in the last 20 years after the ex soviet archives. buckley also a couple years younger than rusher, all of you know that he wrote god, man and yale after graduating from yale. he has two beasts with yale and rusher was a graduate of princeton prewar and during the war. insufficiently respectful of religion despite religious heritage and religious heritage, most elite academia, they don't present the free enterprise side of economics. they're too keynesian
to the lowest level since president eisenhower sat in the oval office. statements like this are so far removed from the truth. in fact, this president has increased spending to 25 percent of gdp, whereas it was 20 percent of the bush ministration. it was 16 percent under eisenhower. so they say these things and the press does not correct in. have you went public opinion that that? >> i think that was set on saturday night live, was the? david: no. taken seriously. >> well, first, you get a spokesman. the "wall street journal" said the other day, each house should get a spokesman. a spokesperson. one voice speaking for the leaders instead of having to and people go at once. another thing have to do is, but positive things. radical tax reform a different -- flat tax for having these non-negotiable ious with social security chained to a marketable bonds. you can make it debt payments. how about passing a law saying you cannot use the medicare money for obamacare. start throwing in offense. pass these things. that harry reid on -- dagen blocking a bill. david: is comments notwithstanding, the budg
succession. this has been true president after president. someone they love get sick and eisenhower, conservative eisenhower, his wife's mother has a health episode. all of a sudden i guess mr. health care. he decides to have a year of health care. this is a guy who didn't think you should submit a budget to congress because congress should be the budget authority. and all of a sudden you of health care. he discovers health care in part because his mother-in-law get sick. so that's one thing driving this presidents. but there's another thing. health care is problematic. people get sick of the problems of health care, cost, access to health insurance, america's health in general is a problem that presidents can't avoid. so they're driven by personal reasons because people they love get sick and they're driven because of the problem that won't go away. the issue, boring, complicated, convoluted, but presidents can't avoid it. we went to every presidential archive and studied the memos written and so forth and discover lots of unexpected things. but our favorite story is the lyndon b.
in what marshall called -- and northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious at the united states didn't open up the second front and that the united states went instead basically defend the british empire. >> there would be a lot of missed trust between the united states and the soviets beginning during the war. there were seeds of the cold war actually visible during the war. in june of 44, there's certain tensions of course because the fact we delayed the second front is that the soviets had on their own largely defeated the germans after stalingrad and were pushing across central europe and eastern europe moving toward berlin during that time. so the united states comes in. we lost the military initiative by the point i was lost a diplomatic initiative at that point. so there's certain deals being made. deals between churchill and stalin in october of 44. the british would get 90%, the russians would get 90%, and oak area and hungry, lined up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies in april of 40, his last telegram to church was would always have these minor d
in your films? the bomb, youith obam can work your way through the eisenhower years. he was a benign face, but their foreign policy starts a parade of intervention that is criminal. and he gets away with it. he builds up our arsenal of 30,000 nuclear warheads. >> p p e has one finger on the button when he takes off -- he has one finger on the button when he takes office. a dozen fingers when he leaves. >> he puts us in vietnam. he financed 80% of it. he was definitely with the colonialists. after world war ii, to be in anglophobe is very important, because the british do go back to all of these places. truman is seduced, influence, pressured, whatever. he goes right with the british position, everything he was warned not to do by roosevelt. we go back into indochina, back into correa, back into supporting the colonial position in the third world. eisenhower continued down. kennedy continued it. there is an argument that planned tofinitely ca withdraw from vietnam. i went to vietnam. i served. it was not like a st. paul in damascus moment where i read woke up and changed, that i did come b
an american u-2 spy plane during dwight eisenhower's last year as president. and george w. bush's second term was bookended by emergencies, hurricane katrina's destruction of the gulf coast early on, the financial meltdown at the end. and after eight years, those moments of crisis could determine a president's legacy. >> when you're in the second term, you have no -- nothing left to run for, except a place in history. >> reporter: a number of presidents in their second terms have focused heavily on foreign policy. and now that mr. obama has begun the job of replacing his outgoing secretaries of state and defense and the director of the cia, he'll have some new faces to work with on his foreign policy team. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> and next hour, we take a closer look at the issues that will likely define president obama's second term. >>> randi, what's coming up next? >> we have a whole lot still ahead, victor. she set fashion trends four years ago when president obama was sworn into office, so what will michelle obama wear to this weekend's inaugural events? we'll have a look at the fi
this happened and when it came out was during world war ii, general eisenhower was having a long-term affair with an attractive young british driver named kate summers v. what general hires a young female model to be his date and save a major workout in? a margin of eisenhower's affair came out during world war ii and does happen to petraeus, was recovered at eight before d-day? during the great depression, roosevelt was having affairs. franklin roosevelt had to long-term affairs. from the missy the hand, marguerite is a personal aide in secretary and coat and dress their and undress her. they, too. but if we found out about fdr's misbehavior one of which are fdr out of office and demanded his visit nation economy was recovering? on way back to the french and indian war. the young george washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. name is sally fairfax, an attractive, older sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters have become public during the french and indian war for the revolutionary war, much as petraeus is enough to team public and what we
eisenhower took very personally nixon's defeat. he said he knew how the condemned man felt, watching the scaffolding being built. host: people are talking about vice president biden in 2016. is that the measure of a successful presidency? guest: it is, but history argues that the last time that happened install martin van buren. arguably, americans were voting for a third reagan term albeit kinder and gentler. one of the problems for the first president bush was, he spent the first four years with the true reaganites looking over his shoulder. it complicated his political host: during his acceptance speech in 1988, he talked about a kinder, gentler nation, nancy reagan said, kinder or gentler than what? that is how the story goes. [laughter] a caller from hastings, england. welcome to the program. caller: the speech that in winston churchill made, i want to quote part of that. it relates to what the gentleman has just been talking about, technology. it said, "the stone age may science, and what might now destruction." i think he is talking about the weapons and guns we have now, also
the election with 332 electoral votes. it's the first time since eisenhower that a president won 51% of the popular vote twice. and we're learning more about the inauguration. chief justice ron roberts will swear the president is just like he did the first time around. but let's remember who will be right there next to the president, vice president joe biden. he will be sworn in by supreme court justice sonya sotomayor, the first hispanic person to administer an inaugural oath of office. but yesterday, it was joe being joe. classic biden. and i loved every minute of it. >> hey, mom. >> how are you? good to see you. i'm joe biden. >> who do you want me to look at? >> whoever you want. >> anybody else want to be sworn in as a senator today? >> i could watch that all day. but let's face it. joe biden is a great politician. he's likable. he's loyal. he's tough. and, most importantly, he knows how to get things done in washington. joining me now is bob schrum, senior advisor to john kerry's presidential campaign and now a professor at nyu. and maria theresa, a president and c.e.o. a voto
only thinks privately. and hagel would be to this administration what eisenhower was in the '50s and what colin powell was in the 1990s. the guy who has seen war really up close and doesn't allow any of his colleagues to imagine that once you launch a war, that you can control what happens afterwards. that's what eisenhower used to say again and again. you're a student of history, chris. you know that's why he kept us out of vietnam. that is exactly -- >> kept us out of suez, too. >> exactly. that was eisenhower's greatest sense of pride was at the height of the cold war for eight years he kept us out of a ground war. he ended the war in korea. this is the kind of guy that hagel is. and he will bring the very dark lessons of iraq and afghanistan into the iran debate, and i think that's fundamentally what the republican foreign policy establishment fears. >> had a couple middle eastern fellows on both sides of that line over there. add into that list of people who have seen the face of war and became peace fellows, rabin, the great martyr in israel. throw in the name anwar sadat.
roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural. the president said, i came in with a huge crisis, i have been leading this country through, we're on the right path. we are going to keep going. he has a phrase in there -- have we found our happy valley? it was a very fine speech. i would have to go back and look at it again. i do not read it as being an aggressive speak. he was speaking to the whole country, but he was not in campaign mode. roosevelt was very good in that way. of course, eisenhower never sounded like that. >> that speech is recognized as one of the better second inaugurals. i think it does echoes some of the themes of obama, president obama. one of back and look the lines in that speech is, i see a nation ill-clothed -- one-third of the nation. he talked about income inequality, pushing forward the new deal, making the country work for all people. >> cassie is wit
, department of defense playing a big role in tomorrow's ceremony. guest: dwight eisenhower took very personally nixon's defeat. he said he knew how the condemned man felt, watching the scaffolding being built. host: people are talking about vice president biden in 2016. is that the measure of a successful presidency? guest: it is, but history argues that the last time that happened -- andrew jackson was able to install martin van buren. arguably, americans were voting for a third reagan term albeit kinder and gentler. host: there is a story that goes with that with nancy reagan. guest: i'm sure there is. one of the problems for the first president bush was, he spent the first four years with the true reaganites looking over his shoulder. it complicated his political life. host: during his acceptance speech in 1988, he talked about a kinder, gentler nation, nancy reagan said, kinder or gentler than what? that is how the story goes. [laughter] a caller from hastings, england. this program is carried live on the bbc program. welcome to the program. caller: the speech that in winston chu
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